• Francesca Concina

U.S. Wine Industry: scenario & emerging consumer trends

Aggiornato il: ago 20

Domestic overproduction, wine tariffs on EU imports, and the covid-19 crisis impacted dramatically the economical and social scenario. We are at a turning point, where both domestic and international players have to re-shape their presence in the market and re-think in a meaningful way the relationship with their customers.


[VERSIONE IN ITALIANO A SEGUIRE]


2020 is going to be one of the most challenging but compelling years in the U.S. Wine Industry.

As Rob McMillan, EVP e Founder della Silicon Valley Bank's Wine Division, explains in the US Wine Report 2020, in the past years and especially in 2019 the wine market scenario has changed quickly. The equilibrium between supply and demand has been put in danger by domestic overproduction. The resulting could be the lowering in prices for domestic brands, the shift to a more quality product, the removal of acres of grapes. Last January, IWSR reported wine sales have declined by 0,9 % in 2019 for the first time in 25 years. Then, suddenly, coronavirus forced consumers to buy online - according to Nielsen, wine sales for the week ending May 9 were up 267% year over year- while Ho.Re.Ca (hotellerie, restaurants, café, catering) started navigating in rough water. “Consumers are not shopping, are buying and they are buying brands” states Gino Colangelo, Colangelo&Partners, to Cathrine Todd while forecasting the future of the Italian Wine Industry in the U.S.

There is only one thing certain: 2020 is a turning point, and both domestic and international players have to re-shape their presence in the market and re-think the relation with their customers.

We can identify three main points to better understand this scenario and consumer behavior:

1. The domestic overproduction and wine tariffs on EU imports

2. The consequences of covid-19 crisis on customer’s behavior

3. The changing in the wine consumer profiling


1. U.S. Overproduction and Wine Tariffs

Rob McMillan explained that the U.S. wine market has already been exposed to oversupply in the past, as in the case of the large vintages, or the speculative overplanting in 2001. However, while at that time the solution was pushing on the higher consumer demand through marketing strategies, now there is a major problem. The demand has been overestimated, resulting in a “consumer-bubble” which is exploding also because of the record 2018 harvest and the economic crisis due to covid-19.

On top of that, starting from October ’19 the U.S. Government decided to apply Wine Tariffs to foreign wines (currently from France, Germany, and Spain – under 14% alcohol, 25% tariffs). Where does this decision starting from? “This is tied to a dispute over European subsidies to Airbus, which were determined to be illegal by the WTO because they put the American aerospace industry at a disadvantage. The U.S.is entitled to put tariffs on “certain European Union” goods, including wine” explains very clearly Jill Bart on Forbes.


Credit: State of the Wine Industry 2020 by Rob McMillan, pg.46


This decision is not impacting just international wineries, but is having a huge impact on American SMB: importers, distributors, restaurants, and wine shops have all reduced the number of wines they import or sell, cutting consequently both jobs and income – especially small businesses. “If tariffs impact price to the degree that importers and distributors can’t represent them, then wine shops and restaurants are less likely to offer the range of choice that U.S. consumers have come to enjoy” says Scott Ades, President of Dalla Terra Winery Direct an importer for small, family-owned Italian wineries, to Jill Bart.


2. Consequences of covid-19 crisis on customer’s behavior


During the lockdown, people find themselves “home alone”, without knowing how long the emergency could have perpetuated. The first reaction was buying as much food and essential goods as possible, and wine has been seen as an "end-of-the-day reward" for their forced isolation.

It is always difficult to generalize concepts while speaking about “consumer behavior”, because every state - and almost every city - has its cultural heritage and habits in terms of wine and gastronomic culture and history. Thinking about the United States, this applied at least to 50 States of mind plus many more metropolis, cities, towns, suburbs. However, you can find some “touching points” and convergent attitudes during emergencies and crises. Michael Skurnik, from Skurnik Wine&Spirit who is working in the wine industry since 1987, explained to Cathrine Todd what happened in New York. “During the first week of isolation, it seemed a wine store could sell anything and everything. Then the following week saw an increase of bottles in the $20 to $30 range and the third week saw a return to high-end wines”.

The increasing of online selling is a reality confirmed by solid data - at Wine.com, revenue has quadrupled to more than $1 million a day since March 28, and April revenue topped $40 million. The company expects to bring in $100 million this quarter; they also hired 500 people and tripled the marketing spend (Jessica Guynn on USA Today, May, 27th).

This is more than a temporary trend in consumer behavior and must not be underestimated.

Wineries have always focus on tasting rooms, events venues, and trade fairs. They have put most of the marketing budget on strategies to promote offline selling.


Now, with all the restrictions put in place, and the need for health and safety as a priority, wineries have to find a way to build a meaningful online relationship with their clients.


Some have already started to walk this way, they pivot to digital starting creating communities around their brand, and they were more prepared during the covid-19 crisis. They engaged the community being part of the interests of people, conquering a spot in their d-day (digital day) by creating content relevant for them. Wine lessons, online tasting and visiting, wine clubs for buying at a special price and selected products, wine pairing and recipes, and so on. The most important and winning aspect was the human touch surrounding each idea, the innovation, and the relevance of the content and the channel (not all the people know how to participate in a zoom call).

Social content needs to reflect the reality of the situation we are in, while also being purposeful in one of three ways: highlighting essential information, supporting the community, or offering entertainment and engagement while consumers are at home.” “Brands will need to take a more inventive approach to social media in the coming months, but should remember to keep honesty and community at the heart of their communication,” says Meek, CEO of IWSR, exactly aligned to our vision as explained in the post of last week.

3. The New Wine Consumer

It is impossible to ignore the inner change in the profiling of the U.S. wine consumer.

The wine lover baby-boomers generation is retiring, and being replaced by millennials and Gen Zers. They consume less wine (alcohol in general), prefer Beer, spiked seltzer, and to some extend Cannabis. Wine is more expensive, but from a marketing and communication perspective, Rob McMillan underlines as the U.S did not create resonance with “young and frugal” consumers' values. Brands did not align the communication with millennials and Gen Zers, and at the moment they do not have a reason to buy wine. It is a long journey, the sooner wineries will start, the better.

Credit: State of the Wine Industry 2020 by Rob McMillan, pg.51


U.S. WINE INDUSTRY: SCENARIO, TREND EMERGENTI e NUOVI CONSUMATORI


Sovraproduzione interna, dazi per l'import UE e la crisi covid-19 hanno avuto un impatto shock sullo scenario socio-economico statunitense e sulla wine industry. Siamo a un punto di svolta: aziende nazionali e internazionali devono ripensare la propria presenza sul mercato e creare relazioni di valore con i propri clienti.


Il 2020 sarà un anno ricco di sfide ma decisamente interessante per lo sviluppo dello scenario della wine industry americana. Come presenta con dati chiari ed esaustivi Rob MacMillan, EVP e Founder della Silicon Valley Bank's Wine Division nel US Wine Report 2020, negli ultimi anni, e specialmente a partire dal 2019, il mercato del vino ha iniziato a trasformarsi sensibilmente. L’equilibrio fra domanda ed offerta, da sempre garantito da una domanda pressoché tendente all’infinito, viene a vacillare a causa della sovraproduzione interna. Le conseguenze potrebbero essere un calo dei prezzi di alcuni vini, o la scelta di puntare sulla qualità per altri, o la rimozione forzata di acri di vigneto.

Lo scorso gennaio la IWSR riporta, per la prima volta in 25 anni, un calo dello 0,9% nelle vendite. Poi, all’improvviso, arriva il coronavirus che sposta forzatamente e in massa i consumatori sulle vendite online - secondo dati Nielsen le vendite nella settimana del 9 maggio in confronto all’anno precedente sono state del +267% - mentre l’Ho.Re.Ca soffre e inizia a navigare in acque tempestose. “I consumatori non fanno shopping, comprano e comprano brand” conferma Gino Colangelo, di Colangelo&Partner, a Cathrine Todd in un’intervista per Forbes parlando del futuro dei vini italiani negli Stati Uniti.

C’è solo una certezza: il 2020 è un punto di svolta, e sia i player domestici che internazionali devono ripensare alla propria presenza sul mercato, ridefinendo la relazione con i propri clienti.

É possible identificare tre punti per meglio comprendere lo scenario wine e il comportamento del consumatore al giorno d’oggi:

1. La sovraproduzione interna e i dazi sull’import

2. Le conseguenze che il covid-19 ha portato sul comportamento di consumo

3. Il cambiamento della profilazione del consumatore statunitense


1. La sovraproduzione interna e i dazi sull’import


Rob McMillan spiega che il mercato wine degli Stati Uniti è già stato soggetto a fenomeni di sovraproduzione in passato, ad esempio durante grandi annate, o nel caso delle abbondanti piantagioni del 2001. In quei casi, comunque, la soluzione fu spingere dal punto di vista marketing per stimolare la domanda, molto ampia in quel mercato. Oggi il problema è maggiore, poiché la domanda è stata sovrastimata e si è creata una “consumer-bubble”ora alimentata anche dalla vendemmia record del 2018 e dalla crisi economica post covid-19.


In aggiunta, da ottobre il governo degli Stati Uniti ha deciso di applicare dei dazi ai vini stranieri (al momento Francia, Germania e Spagna - sotto 14% alcohol, 25% tariffs). Da dove arriva questa decisione? “This is tied to a dispute over European subsidies to Airbus, which were determined to be illegal by the WTO because they put the American aerospace industry at a disadvantage. The U.S.is entitled to put tariffs on “certain European Union” goods, including wine” spiega con estrema chiarezza Jill Bart su Forbes.

Credit: State of the Wine Industry 2020 by Rob McMillan, pg.46


La decisione non è di interesse solo per le aziende internazionali, ma sta avendo un impatto anche su quelle americane, specie le PMI: importatori, distributori, ristoranti e wine shop hanno ridotto l’offerta tagliando di conseguenza posti di lavoro e introiti. “If tariffs impact price to the degree that importers and distributors can’t represent them, then wine shops and restaurants are less likely to offer the range of choice that U.S. consumers have come to enjoy” spiega Scott Ades, Presidente di Dalla Terra Winery Direct importatore per piccolo aziende vitivinicole a conduzione familiar Italian a Jill Bart.

2. Le conseguenze che il covid-19 ha portato sul comportamento dei consumatori


È sempre difficile generalizzare quando si parla di “comportamento del consumatore” perché ogni stato, ogni città, ogni paese ha la sua cultura eno-gastronomica. In riferimento agli Stati Uniti si dovrebbero applicare almeno 50 “States of Mind” insieme ad altrettante metropoli, città, quartieri. Tuttavia durante le emergenze è possibile riscontrare alcuni comportamenti e attitudini simili fra le persone.


Durante il lockdown le persone si sono trovate sole a casa, spesso in piccoli appartamenti, senza sapere quanto quella situazione si sarebbe perpetuata. La prima reazione è stata comprare cibo e beni di prima necessità, e il vino si è posto come un piccolo premio da godersi a fine giornata.

Michael Skurnik, titolare della Skurnik Wine&Spirit che opera nel settore dal 1987 spiega Cathrine Todd cosa è successo a New York “During the first week of isolation, it seemed a wine store could sell anything and everything. Then the following week saw an increase of bottles in the $20 to $30 range and the third week saw a return to high-end wines”.

L'aumento delle vendite online è una realtà, confermata dai dati - a Wine.com hanno quadruplicate I ricavi fino a $1 milione al giorno a partire dal 28 marzo, e ad aprile i ricavi hanno toccato i $40 milioni. L’azienda prevede di arrivare a $100 milioni questo Q; hanno inoltre assunto 500 persone e triplicato il budget marekting (Jessica Guynn on USA Today, May, 27th).

Questo è molto più di un trend nel comportamento dei consumatori, e non deve essere sottostimato.

Le aziende vitivinicole hanno sempre puntato sulle visite di persona e tasting room, su eventi in grandi venues, fiere, spendendo la maggior parte del loro budget marketing per promuovere gli stessi. Tutti eventi offline.

Ora, con le restrizioni in atto ma soprattutto con il disperato bisogno di sicurezza, certezza, salute che le persone vanno cercando, le aziende devono cambiare le loro priorità e trovare un modo intelligente, coinvolgente, aderente alla realtà di oggi per creare e consolidare relazioni di valore con i propri clienti.


Alcune hanno già iniziato questo percorso, facendo leva sul digital per creare communities intorno al loro brand e sono riuscite a rispondere meglio alla crisi covid-19. Hanno coinvolto la community entrando nelle nicchie di interesse delle persone, conquistando uno spazio nel d-day (digital day) quotidiano creando contenuto rilevante. Wine lesson, online tasting, visite virtuali, wine clubs per conoscere e comprare edizioni speciali, wine pairing e via dicendo.

La cosa più importante e premiante è l’aspetto umano che deve sempre sottendere l’idea, l’innovazione, e la rilevanza per il pubblico in ascolto, insieme alla scelta del giusto canale (non per tutti zoom è l’ideale, anche se è trendy).

Social content needs to reflect the reality of the situation we are in, while also being purposeful in one of three ways: highlighting essential information, supporting the community, or offering entertainment and engagement while consumers are at home.” “Brands will need to take a more inventive approach to social media in the coming months, but should remember to keep honesty and community at the heart of their communication,” dice Meek, CEO di IWSR, esattamente in linea con la nostra vision, riportata nel post della scorsa settimana.


3. Il Nuovo U.S. Wine Consumer

È impossibile ignorare la trasformazione interna che sta avvenendo fra il pubblico americano. I wine lover della generazione baby-boomer si stanno ritirando, mentre i millenials e i Gen Zers stanno emergendo. Questi giovani consumano meno vino, non solo per scelta economica, ma anche perché preferiscono i sostituti quali birra, bevande gassate e in certi casi la Cannabis. Il vino è sicuramente più costoso ma dal punto di vista della comunicazione e marketing, Rob McMillan spiega come negli Stati Uniti non si sia riusciti a creare connessione con queste nuove generazioni considerate “young and frugal” allineandosi con i loro valori.

Credit: State of the Wine Industry 2020 by Rob McMillan, pg.51

145 visualizzazioni

© 2020 IPR Srls | P.IVA e Codice Fiscale 10747920964 | Milano | Privacy Policy | Cookie | Credits